AELE LAW LIBRARY OF CASE SUMMARIES:
Corrections Law
for Jails, Prisons and Detention Facilities


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Search: Body Cavity

     A jury verdict that a county jail did not violate the rights of a man detained for civil contempt by subjecting him to an invasive body cavity search was set aside by a federal trial court as against the manifest weight of the evidence, when the detainee was not charged with any crime, and deputies at the facility did not state that they had any suspicion about the detainee which would justify the type of search conducted. A new trial was therefore granted on the plaintiff's claim. Thompson v. County of Cook, No. 03C7172, 428 F. Supp. 2d 807 (N.D. Ill. 2006). [N/R]
     Strip search, including a digital rectal search, of a prisoner who allegedly refused to cooperate and injured a guard in resisting was reasonable and justified by a legitimate interest in maintaining order and security. The prisoner's "conclusory" assertion that the glove used to conduct the search was "dirty" was insufficient to show that the search was conducted in an unsanitary manner in violation of the Eighth Amendment. Green v. Hallam, No. 03-2562, 105 Fed. Appx. 858 (7th Cir. 2004). [N/R]
     Inmate who completed only the first step of a multi-step jail grievance procedure failed to satisfy the requirements of the Prison Litigation Reform Act (PLRA), 42 U.S.C. Sec. 1997e, that he exhaust available administrative remedies before filing his lawsuit seeking damages for an allegedly unreasonable body cavity search. Morgan v. Maricopa County, 259 F. Supp. 2d 985 (D. Ariz. 2003). [N/R]
     Manual search of prisoner's rectal cavity for the purposes of preventing drugs from entering an administrative segregation unit did not violate his Fourth Amendment or Eighth Amendment rights when carried out in prison infirmary's emergency room by medical personnel. Alleged violation of prison regulation requiring the exhaustion of other search methods first did not establish a constitutional violation. Wiley v. Serrano, #00-55997, 37 Fed. Appx. 252, 2002 U.S. App. Lexis 9736 (9th Cir. 2002). [2002 JB Nov]
     267:42 Texas prisoner complaining that body cavity searches were used to sexually harass him could not proceed as pauper in lawsuit or appeal of dismissal when he previously filed four frivolous lawsuits and did not allege imminent danger of serious physical harm at time of filing lawsuit or appeal. Banos v. O'Guin, #97-40354, 144 F.3d 883 (5th Cir. 1998).
     241:13 Jury verdict that body cavity search was cruel and unusual punishment in violation of the Eighth Amendment was "inconsistent" with its further finding that prison guards were also entitled to qualified immunity; federal appeals court orders further proceedings. Koch v. Ricketts, 82 F.3d 317 (9th Cir. 1996).
     217:13 Digital rectal probes of all prisoners transferred to institution's most secure area was unconstitutional in the absence of "predicate cause" for particular searches; defendant prison officials, however, were entitled to qualified immunity from liability. Castillo v. Gardner, 854 F.Supp. 725 (E.D. Wash. 1994).
     221:75 Visual body cavity searches, conducted on all prisoners, were justified by emergency situation of increasing violence in prison; necessity for swift action justified conducting search of group of prisoners in one location. Elliott v. Lynn, 38 F.3d 188 (5th Cir. 1994).
     [N/R] Digital rectal search of prisoner was not cruel and unusual punishment; search was based on legitimate objectives and was not conducted in an unnecessarily brutal, painful or humiliating manner. Del Raine v. Williford, 32 F.3d 1024 (7th Cir. 1994).
     Prison officials were entitled to qualified immunity from liability for policy permitting digital rectal probe searches on all inmates entering a secured area of the prison; officials testified that they researched the legality of the searches before implementing the policy. Hemphill v. Kincheloe, 987 F.2d 589 (9th Cir. 1993).
     Visual body cavity searches of prisoners before and after contact visits were reasonable regardless of whether there was probable cause, when conducted to prevent possession of weapons and contraband; possible violation of Wisconsin prison regulation in conducting search was not a violation of constitutional rights. Zunker v. Bertrand, 798 F.Supp. 1365 (E.D. Wis. 1992).
     Prison policy of random visual body cavity searches of inmates designed to prevent trafficking in contraband was not unconstitutional. Covino v. Patrissi, 967 F.2d 73 (2nd Cir. 1992). Digital rectal probe of prisoner prior to placement in unit housing particularly violent offenders was rationally connected to a legitimate interest in safety and order. Terrovona v. Brown, 783 F.Supp. 1281 (W.D. Wash. 1991).
     Prison officials were entitled to qualified immunity for conducting visual body cavity search of male inmate in the presence of female correctional officers, based on reasonable, even if mistaken, belief that an emergency existed. Cookish v. Powell, 945 F.2d 441 (1st Cir. 1991).
     Prison policy of subjecting all prisoners transferred to intensive management unit to digital rectal probes, absent probable cause for concealment of contraband, was unconstitutional; prisoner subjected to search awarded $1 in nominal damages. Wetmore v. Garner, 735 F.Supp. 974 (E.D. Wash. 1990).
     Associate Warden liable to inmate for $4,000 for digital anal body cavity search without legitimate penological purpose. Hill v. Koon, 732 F.Supp. 1076 (D. Nev. 1990).

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